Luxury Hotels

THAT WAS THE YEAR THAT WAS

The last destination od 2023 was, for Girlahead, Marrakech. Arrival was by train, a 145-minute jolt from Casablanca. and jolt it was, in old Chinese rolling stock on a high-speed track.

Four Seasons Marrakech of course were there to meet, and greet. And Thomas Krooswijk, GM of the hotel, was there at the main entrance – not so much a door as a covered walkway, which leads to an indoor sitting rooom flanked by two 1.5-metre high white bird cages. The birds are gorgeously bright and cheerful. One is Mango: ‘from the island of Madagascar I love chirping to greet our guests, join me in spreading warmth and cheer through every tweet!!’. The cages are covered at night so the birds can sleep.

Girlahead, by the way, was to sleep extremely well. There’s something about a Four Seasons bed that guarantees a jolly good night – see the video below.

The hotel was owned by Kingdom when it opened in 2011 but now it belongs to the Mangalji family’s Westmont Hospitality Group. There are 139 rooms, and 23 villas (and riad residences). It’s actually much more convenient staying in the main block and, honestly, even those on vacation want as much time as possible, time to do what they want to do rather than time being buggied, or waiting for buggies. The only exception here at Four Seasons Marrakech is getting to the gym. It is relatively easy getting back from gym to bedroom but vice versa is harder than solving Mr Rubic’s cube.

It was, however, more than worth getting to the fitness area. There are two rooms, overseen by one of the most humorous personal trainers in the industry. An ample solid man, he was so gentle in helping people stretch like this, pull like that, you wanted to work out more for him, as well as for yourself.

There’s always a lot going on, inside and outside. A first-class glass-walled boutique off the main lobby has items that really attract, and some interior walls of the main block have large oils by Bernard Touati, for sale at about €8,500. Question for the artist, why does your idea of Eden look more like a messed up plate of scrambled egg with slivers of tomato in it? But then art is often a talking point.

As is food. Read on, tomorrow…