Luxury Hotels

Bangkok – London – Dolomites

See this tempting dish, above, at Normandie, in Mandarin Oriental, Bangkok. Dining is a current enticement for the brand’s loyal FANS, says Kristin Ruble, Group VP Brand and Experience Marketing for Mandarin Oriental. FANS dining benefits include tastes of something special upon arrival at restaurants and other benefits come free WiFi (actually Girlahead cannot be alone in querying why any hotel company, let alone at luxury level, dares to charge for basic WiFi these days).

**

What do uni students actually study?  Girlahead bets she is not the only taxpayer sometimes to wonder.  Well, in UK young adults at LSE (London School of Economics) have, working with colleagues at University of Sussex Business School have studied wine lists at 249 restaurants in London. Not surprisingly they discovered a massive, well, 700%, markup on wine lists over retail prices. The surprise, however, came from the bottle prices on menus. The highest markup was not on the second-cheapest on the menu, as was thought, but on the third-cheapest wine. In fact, to get the lowest markup veer towards the cheapest, and cheapest-but-one, wine – or anything in the top third of the list.  LSE Professor David de Mesa suggests an embarrassment theory would prevent choosing the cheapest, or cheapest-but-one, wine.

**

More food-and-drink.  In the Dolomites, Rosa Alpina, Aman’s only partner hotel, takes its fine dining high up.   Themed St. Hubertus Unplugged, every Sunday, at 8.30 a.m.,  27th June to 5th September, 2021, guests can join the culinary brigade on a foraging hike up to 2,000 metres. The goal is a hotel-owned cabin, without electricity, on the Piz Sorega plateau among stunning meadows. There are aperitivos at noon, after which chef Norbert Niederkofler, working only with a wood-burning fire, produces a five-course lunch.

**

All that exercise must be music to the ears of Ingo Schweder, who apart from running GOCO also heads wellness for Horwath HTL. He points out that wellness travel has grown by a minimum six percent annually since 2015. He urges hotel developers seriously to consider installing in-room air purification filters, circadian lighting, healthy mini-bar alternatives and more. He believes opportunities for creating a genuine wellness guest experience are almost limitless. Take biohacking, the fastest-growing and most significant health and lifestyle trend (biohacking is hacking the body to achieve positive results both physically and mentally). Despite its tech-focused name and Silicon Valley- connotations, incorporating biohacking into hospitality is simpler than it looks. Specialised diet plans and alkaline drinking water can help maintain their personal biohack regimes, while more advanced offerings, such as complimentary wearable tech that provides daily biofeedback and in-room nootropic- spiked elixirs, can service the next generation of wellness travellers  keen to push the boundaries on how far the body, the mind, and even DNA, can evolve.

**

Get the biohacking right and you are all the more ready for the theatre of eating.  Hear, again, what Jumeirah CEO José Silva has to say, here: