Food & Wine Luxury Hotels

Maldives – Hanoi – London

Nicholas Clayton, Singapore-based CEO of the growing Capella group, is normally quite formal – see him, above, in Capella, Shanghai. But this is a chameleon former banker, and to introduce Pontiac Land’s Patina Maldives, which opens 18th May on the Fari Islands, he wore a straw hat and Hawaiian shirt, while the 90-key resort’s ultra-chatty GM, one-time restaurateur Marco Den Ouden, was in chef’s blacks, and a baseball hat. This resort will be entertainment, said ‘Mr Clayton’, as everyone else in on the call called him. What really made Girlahead leap with enthusiasm are Patina’s bespoke nutritional lozenges (who wants bedtime chocolates these days?): made by Melissa Snover’s Nourished company, the one-bite goodies are unsweet and addictive and doing you so much good, check get-nourished.com for more details.  Yes, it does sound as if Patina will be lifestyle with a difference, offering family programmes rather than kids’ kicks, and at all times perpetuality instead of simple sustainability and wellness.  This promises to be different, yippee.

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Talking of difference, Capella’s newest hotel, the 47-key Capella Hanoi, has been dreamt up by designer Bill Bensley (see below) as a “petite auberge” – a rendezvous spot for the greatest opera singers, composers and artists of a glamorous bygone age.

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And more differentiation. In London, The Beaumont hosts another virtual literary evening on Tuesday, April 20 with a reading of The Interior Silence: 10 Lessons from Monastic Life with the author, Sarah Sands, who during the pandemic has been trying many different strategies to de-stress. Here she  identifies common characteristics of monastic life and the wisdom to be learned from them , includinga clarity of mind and an unexpected capacity for solitude.

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Girlahead believes in blueberries, to destress and more. Blue Zones spoke with Dr Barbara Shukitt-Hale (USDA staff scientist in the Laboratory of Neuroscience and Aging, USDA-ARS, Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging HNRCA at Tufts University in Boston): “It’s not only the antioxidant capacity that’s important; it’s their anti-inflammatory capacities, as well as their direct effects on the brain – blueberries and strawberries increase neurogenesis, which is the process of making new neurons in the brain.”

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Finally, today, listen again to versatile designer Bill Bensley: